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Thursday, May 27, 2010

Joint Integrative Medicine Practice coming to Conway, SC


Joint Practice coming soon to Conway, SC

Dr. Melody Iles PhD, ND is a naturopathic doctor offering natural health consultations and has been in practice for some time in downtown Conway. She will be joined by JP Saleeby, MD (integrative and general medicine) in July at a new location in Conway.

Link to Dr. Iles' web site: www.natural-health.cc

Link to Dr. Saleeby's web site: www.saleeby.net

New practice web site: www.SCWellness.net

Dr. Saleeby to join practice officially August 1st, 2010. New patients are encouraged to make appointments soon.

Sunday, May 23, 2010

Colognes & Perfumes can affect Sex Hormones

"Secret" Ingredients Damage Sperm


cologne aftershave

By Denny Watkins

The "secret" ingredients that give colognes their particular scents could also be damaging sperm, according to a study by the nonprofit consumer advocate Environmental Working Group.

Researchers analyzed the chemical composition of 17 perfumes and colognes and discovered that many scented products contain compounds that have the potential to interact with hormones. One chemical, a solvent called diethyl pthalate, was found in 12 products and was linked to sperm damage in a 2006 Harvard study. Sperm damage can lower fertility.

What's more, DEP is just one of 12 different hormone-disrupting compounds found in the colognes. Georgio Armani's Acqua di Gio, for example, contains seven compounds that interact with either estrogen or androgen (female and male hormones) or both, according to the study.

"We don't know how harmful repeated use of these colognes and perfumes are, because the emphasis in the industry is not on long-term testing," says study author Dr. Olga V. Naidenko.

"While infrequent use could be fine, because the same chemicals show up in many different products, over time they can build up in your body and have bad effects," she says.

The EWG's study aimed to determine how many chemicals are used in colognes that are not listed on the label. Fragrance manufacturers can skirt some rules about listing the contents of their products because the formulas for a particular scent are trademarked and considered proprietary knowledge.

The colognes and perfumes tested were a random sampling of products the average consumer might find at a department or drugstore.

A fragrance by American Eagle Outfitters called AE77 had the most undisclosed ingredients with 24 chemicals, followed by Chanel Coco with 18 unlisted ingredients. Dolce and Gabbana Light Blue had the fewest unlisted ingredients, containing just seven.

While DEP is used as a solvent in the fragrances, other unlisted ingredients seem to help create the cologne's particular scent -- but that doesn't mean they're harmless. The study describes two synthetic musks, galaxolide and tonalide, as interfering with estrogen and androgen. Galaxolide has also been found in the umbilical cords of newborn babies, proving that newborns are exposed to the chemicals in the womb.

EWG is pushing for greater regulation of scented products.

"First, we'd like to see every ingredient listed on the label, because people should know what's going on or in their bodies," Naidenko says. "The next step is to make sure the ingredients used have been thoroughly tested to determine their safety."

The EWG maintains a database of cosmetics and personal care products with hazard ratings.

[editors note: For years I have been warning about environmental compounds affecting sex hormones and sex hormone receptors (environmental estrogen modifiers for example) and I shy away from house air fresheners (Glade, Febreze), fragrances and other non-therapeutic chemicals when at all possible. Stick with natural extracts when you can (sandalwood, lavender). For my bHRT patients, this article rings true, that often the good we do in medicine is thwarted by inadvertent actions at attempts at hygiene and glamour.]

Source: http://www.aolhealth.com/condition-center/mens-sexual-health/cologne-chemicals-damage-sperm

Friday, May 21, 2010

A nice Thank You from an online questioner


Dear Expert,

One questioner just made a rating to your answer on the AllExperts.com site:

Knowledgeability - 10
Clarity of response - 10
Timeliness - 10
Politeness - 10
Prestige Point - 30
Comment - thank you for taking your time to answer my question about statins. i
will take your advice and visit your blog. I know you are very busy and i think
you are doing a great service to people with your advice.

Following is the question information:

Questioner: charlotte
Subject: cholesterol lowering supplements
Date Answered: 2010-05-14 18:25:05

Here is the link of that question: http://www.allexperts.com/expertx.cgi?m=11&expID=1220&qID=4949851


Thank you for volunteering at AllExperts.com.

Saturday, May 15, 2010

May 2010 Carolina Mobile MD Newsletter


This month I am posting an article on Hawthorn (Crataegus) extract and it use in cardiac health, specifically congestive heart failure. This is a natural way to mollify the rages of CHF that can make daily life uncomfortable for most who suffer this malady.

The prior mentioned "Wellness Retreat" for May has been put on the back burner. Details on a wellness retreat will be made once it is back on schedule.

For those interested in learning more about a rather new healthcare model (retainer based/ concierge medicine) that is gaining in popularity [especially in this era of uncertainty regarding health care reform and the future of health care in America] check out a PowerPoint presentation by clicking here.

Hawthorn Extract

by JP Saleeby, MD


The genus Crataegus sp. better known as Hawthorn is a spiny shrub native to the Northern Hemispheres of North America, Asia and Europe. Know for centuries for its medicinal properties, it is the single oldest known herb used in western (or European) medicine. While many of the plant parts such as the flowers, leaves and fruit are used medicinally, those of the dried flowering tops have, at least in the west, stood the test of time and utilization for therapy related to the heart. Chinese medicine (TCM) has used predominantly the berry for its medical uses mostly as a digestive aid.

Extracts of the flower of the Hawthorn plant (specifically
C. monogyna and C. laevigata species) have been intensly studies and the extracts show active ingredients in the oligomeric procyanidine (OPC), flavonoid family of compounds. OPCs are responsible for the free-radical scavenging properties probably best seen in reducing damage due to myocardium injury/insult following ischemia or infarct, as they lessen the effects of neutrophil elastase that is the causative agent in scar tissue formed after myocardial injury (heart attack). Research has shown Hawthorn extracts to have positive inotropic effects that increase cardiac output and the force-frequency ratio in a failing human heart. The Flavonoids found in this herb are active against and inhibit phosphodiesterase and also activate the cardiac endothelium-derived relaxing factor making for increased vasodilation, something that is beneficial in cardiac patients. The flavonoids are further effective in reducing platelet aggregation and adhesion. This is beneficial for prevention of thrombosis and occlusion of coronary vessels (arteries) related to coronary artery disease. Much the same action that aspirin (ASA) and Plavix (clopidogrel) have on platelets we see with Hawthorn.

By and large the greatest impact Hawthorn extracts have on the cardiac system is with the myocardium and its positive effects in cases of congestive heart failure (CHF).
Some researchers state that this herb also stabilized the myocardium and reduces dysrhythmias or abnormal heart rhythms. There was review and analysis of studies reported in the 2008 Cochrane review that showed "alternative" treatments with Hawthorn stood up nicely to more conventional therapies for CHF. When used against placebo in double blinded studies on CHF patients Hawthorn substantially increased maximal work load tolerance, improved symptoms of fatigue and dyspnea (shortness of breath) and increased exercise tolerance in patients with failure. In a separate study by Tauchert M., et al, published in 1994 in a German peer reviewed journal, Hawthorn was compared to the ACE-inhibitor drug Capoten (captopril) head on and the results were favorable for Hawthorn. Standardized doses of Hawthorn provided equal, statistically significant positive results no different than the pharmaceutical agent Capoten. Capoten is a main stay drug of traditional therapy for CHF. In a trial published in 2008 under the acronym SPICE, Dr. Holubarsch, et. al., showed the protective effects of Hawthorn against cardiac death and sudden death in those entered into the trial.

There are no absolute contraindications for taking Hawthorn extracts aside from allergic sensitivity to the plant. Side effects are minimal and those most common are vertigo and dizziness. It is not recommended during pregnancy and/or breastfeeding as it has the potential for uterine stimulation. It is estimated by Dr. Zick, et
. al., in a 2005 study that as many as a third of patients with CHF are taking Complimentary and Alternative Medical (CAM) supplements and that these may have untoward effects in combination with standard drug therapy. Care must be taken with the use of Hawthorn root and such medications as digoxin, vasodilators, ACE-inhibitors, calcium channel blockers. There is the theoretical concern of the potentiation effect of the combination of Hawthorn extract with these other cardiac drugs. However no data exists of problems with concomitant use of digoxin, another drug commonly used in CHF. The dose can range depending on the patient and practitioner, but standard doses are 600 to 1800 mg divided into two or three doses. The German Commission E (to Germany what the Physician Desk Reference (PDR) is to the USA) specifically recommends hawthorn leaf and flower as a therapeutic herb for CHF in its monographs. The German Commission E monographs are some 380 monographs detailing herbs, their uses, dosages, adverse effect and drug interactions along with pharmacological effects that comprise a respected therapeutic guide to herbal medicine practitioners.


Ref:
  1. Dahmer S , Scott E Health Effects of Hawthorn, J. AFP, February 15 2010 Vol. 81 No. 4:465-468.
  2. Tauchert M, et. al, Effectiveness of hawthorn extract L1 132 compared with the ACE-inh. Capopril. Much Med. Wochenschr. 1994;136:S27-33.
  3. Holubarsch CJ, et. al., Investigation of Crataegus extract WS 1442 in CHF (SPICE) trial study group. Eur J. Heart Fail. 2008;10(12):1255-1263.
  4. Zick, SM, et. al., The prevalence and pattern of complementary and alternative supplement use in individuals with chronic heart failure. J Card Fail. 2005;11(8):586-589.
  5. The Complete German Commission E Monographs, Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines, 1st ed. 1998
(c) 2010
---------------------

May 2010 Newsletter




DID YOU KNOW: In the February 17th, 2010 edition of Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) an article was published on how DNA evidence obtained from the mummy remains of King Tut and his relatives were able to prove ancestry. Additionally it shed some light on some genetic and pathologic disorders of Tutankhamun's family.



Quote of the month:
"The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking." - Albert Einstein


(http://docs.google.com/present/view?id=dd4kzr8w_326sqcdsbdg&interval=10) (http://docsaleeby4.blogspot.com/2010/05/hawthorn-extract.html)

Teff - an obscure grain of exceptional nutritional content


Teff: Obscure Grain w/ exceptional nutritional content

by JP Saleeby, MD

As it is the "flavor of the day" nutrients come and go. Whether it is Big Pharma promoting omega 3-fatty acids this month (as if they were just discovered yesterday) or the top vitamin retailer singing the glories of chia seeds, many times these things have been around and utilized for ages by ancient people. Many dietary supplements will wax and wane in popularity, but the fact remains they are often crucial in our diet and well being in the future as they are touted today and were in the past, lest we forget them and move onto the next big craze. Teff for example is a rather obscure grain in the West. It is an annual grass and species of lovegrass which is native to the northern plains of Ethiopia. Teff has it origins as a cultivated grain in Northeastern Africa as far back as 4000 BC, having the hardiness as a plant to adapt to environments ranging from wet and waterlogged soil to that of drought stressed earth.

This plant is not only limited to the lands in Africa, for now it is cultivated in far away places such as India, Australia, Bolivia, Peru and yes even in the USA. There are test fields growing in Kansas right now and it has actually been raised with economic viability in Idaho. Move over potato! Teff can even be harvested successfully in higher colder latitudes such as Alaska due to its ability to be cultivated at steeper elevations and with shorter growing seasons. While the seeds are used to make breads and porridge, the hay is a great feed for livestock as it conveys the same nutritional components.

The attractiveness of this plant is simple; it is rather nutritious. It is high in fiber and iron and provides a rich source of protein and calcium. Additionally, this grain is high in phosphorus, copper, magnesium, thiamin and lysine. In fact it contains all eight essential amino acids. Similar to millet and quinoa in the way it is cooked the Teff seed is, however, much smaller and requires less time to cook. Less time cooking equates to less energy expenditure. So while it may be the food for the masses some time in the future, it will also be a "green grain" for its energy conserving features.

The name Teff is derived from the word tef, from Ethio-Semitic roots meaning "lost." Given the very small size of the grain, it is often lost when scooped up in the hand. In the book "Lost Crops of Africa" published by the National Research Council in 1996, "
Teff has as much, or even more, food value than the major grains: wheat, barley, and maize, for instance. However, this is probably because it is always eaten in the whole-grain form: the germ and bran are consumed along with the endosperm."

Something worth noting about Teff is that it contains no gluten. With the lack of gluten there are not issues with abdominal bloating and gastrointestinal symptoms in those folks having gluten allergies or Celiac Disease. While Teff comes in colors from white to brown, consumers tend to prefer the white despite the fact that it is rather bland in comparison to the red and brown versions and also a bit lower in nutritional composition. This must come from years and years of desiring the "white rice" and "white bleached wheat" loafs of bread Westerners have grown so accustom.

--------------------
Nutritional Information (Teff/ Eragrostis tef)


Moisture (g)

11

Cystine

1.9

Food energy (Kc)

336

Isoleucine

3.2

Protein (g)

9.6

Leucine

6.0

Carbohydrate (g)

73

Lysine

2.3

Fat (g)

2.0

Methionine

2.1

Fiber (g)

3.0

Phenylalanine

4.0

Ash (g)

2.9

Threonine

2.8

Vitamin A (RE)

8

Tryptophan

1.2

Thiamin (mg)

0.30

Tyrosine

1.7

Riboflavin (mg)

0.18

Valine

4.1

Niacin (mg)

2.5



Vitamin C (mg)

88



Calcium (mg)

159



Chloride (mg)

13



Chromium (μg)

250



Copper (mg)

0.7



Iron (mg)

5.8



Magnesium (mg)

170



Manganese (mg)

6.4



Phosphorus (mg)

378



Potassium (mg)

401



Sodium (mg)

47



Zinc (mg)

2





Teff grains are reported to contain 9-11 percent protein, an amount slightly higher than in normal sorghum, maize, or oats. However, samples tested in the United States have consistently shown even higher protein levels: 14-15 %.

The protein's digestibility is probably high because the main protein fractions—albumin, glutelin, and globulin—are the most digestible types. The albumin fraction is particularly rich in lysine. Judging by the response from Americans allergic to wheat, teff is essentially free of gluten, the protein that causes bread to rise. Nonetheless, teff used in injera does ''rise" [due in part to the fermentation process].

-From "Lost Crops of Africa" Vol. 1;Grains (1996)

-----------------------------

My wife and I recently partook in an Ethiopian dinner complete with Injera, the bread made of teff. Here teff is mixed with water and allowed to ferment for a few days, it is then poured over a hot clay plate (traditionally, called a mogogo) which is usually placed over an open fire. The product is a crepe like bread, spongy in nature and with a distinct but subtle sour flavor. Again the white (nech), red (kay) and brown/black (tikur) variants exist, the darker colored breads having a more substantial flavor. Interestingly the bread acts not only as "bread" but a means of serving Ethiopian food. Traditionally, Ethiopian meals are comprised of stews of beef or lamb, with salads and vegetables all served on a "plate" of Injera. The Injera is torn into smaller pieces and used as a "utensil" to pick up and eat the food all the while absorbing the juices the foods produce. The meal is over literally when not only the food is consumed, but when the plate and utensils are consumed as well.

(c)2010

Sunday, May 9, 2010

Hawthorn extract


Hawthorn

by JP Saleeby, MD


The genus Crataegus sp. better known as Hawthorn is a spiny shrub native to the Northern Hemispheres of North America, Asia and Europe. Know for centuries for its medicinal properties, it is the single oldest known herb used in western (or European) medicine. While many of the plant parts such as the flowers, leaves and fruit are used medicinally, those of the dried flowering tops have, at least in the west, stood the test of time and utilization for therapy related to the heart. Chinese medicine (TCM) has used predominantly the berry for its medical uses mostly as a digestive aid.

Extracts of the flower of the Hawthorn plant (specifically C. monogyna and C. laevigata species) have been intensly studies and the extracts show active ingredients in the oligomeric procyanidine (OPC), flavonoid family of compounds. OPCs are responsible for the free-radical scavenging properties probably best seen in reducing damage due to myocardium injury/insult following ischemia or infarct, as they lessen the effects of neutrophil elastase that is the causative agent in scar tissue formed after myocardial injury (heart attack). Research has shown Hawthorn extracts to have positive inotropic effects that increase cardiac output and the force-frequency ratio in a failing human heart. The Flavonoids found in this herb are active against and inhibit phosphodiesterase and also activate the cardiac endothelium-derived relaxing factor making for increased vasodilation, something that is beneficial in cardiac patients. The flavonoids are further effective in reducing platelet aggregation and adhesion. This is beneficial for prevention of thrombosis and occlusion of coronary vessels (arteries) related to coronary artery disease. Much the same action that aspirin (ASA) and Plavix (clopidogrel) have on platelets we see with Hawthorn.

By and large the greatest impact Hawthorn extracts have on the cardiac system is with the myocardium and its positive effects in cases of congestive heart failure (CHF). Some researchers state that this herb also stabilized the myocardium and reduces dysrhythmias or abnormal heart rhythms. There was review and analysis of studies reported in the 2008 Cochrane review that showed "alternative" treatments with Hawthorn stood up nicely to more conventional therapies for CHF. When used against placebo in double blinded studies on CHF patients Hawthorn substantially increased maximal work load tolerance, improved symptoms of fatigue and dyspnea (shortness of breath) and increased exercise tolerance in patients with failure. In a separate study by Tauchert M., et al, published in 1994 in a German peer reviewed journal, Hawthorn was compared to the ACE-inhibitor drug Capoten (captopril) head on and the results were favorable for Hawthorn. Standardized doses of Hawthorn provided equal, statistically significant positive results no different than the pharmaceutical agent Capoten. Capoten is a main stay drug of traditional therapy for CHF. In a trial published in 2008 under the acronym SPICE, Dr. Holubarsch, et. al., showed the protective effects of Hawthorn against cardiac death and sudden death in those entered into the trial.

There are no absolute contraindications for taking Hawthorn extracts aside from allergic sensitivity to the plant. Side effects are minimal and those most common are vertigo and dizziness. It is not recommended during pregnancy and/or breastfeeding as it has the potential for uterine stimulation. It is estimated by Dr. Zick, et. al., in a 2005 study that as many as a third of patients with CHF are taking Complimentary and Alternative Medical (CAM) supplements and that these may have untoward effects in combination with standard drug therapy. Care must be taken with the use of Hawthorn root and such medications as digoxin, vasodilators, ACE-inhibitors, calcium channel blockers. There is the theoretical concern of the potentiation effect of the combination of Hawthorn extract with these other cardiac drugs. However no data exists of problems with concomitant use of digoxin, another drug commonly used in CHF. The dose can range depending on the patient and practitioner, but standard doses are 600 to 1800 mg divided into two or three doses.

The German Commission E (to Germany what the Physician Desk Reference (PDR) is to the USA) specifically recommends hawthorn leaf and flower as a therapeutic herb for CHF in its monographs. The German Commission E monographs are some 380 monographs detailing herbs, their uses, dosages, adverse effect and drug interactions along with pharmacological effects that comprise a respected therapeutic guide to herbal medicine practitioners.



Ref:
  1. Dahmer S , Scott E Health Effects of Hawthorn, J. AFP, February 15 2010 Vol. 81 No. 4:465-468.
  2. Tauchert M, et. al, Effectiveness of hawthorn extract L1 132 compared with the ACE-inh. Capopril. Much Med. Wochenschr. 1994;136:S27-33.
  3. Holubarsch CJ, et. al., Investigation of Crataegus extract WS 1442 in CHF (SPICE) trial study group. Eur J. Heart Fail. 2008;10(12):1255-1263.
  4. Zick, SM, et. al., The prevalence and pattern of complementary and alternative supplement use in individuals with chronic heart failure. J Card Fail. 2005;11(8):586-589.
  5. The Complete German Commission E Monographs, Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines, 1st ed. 1998.
(c) 2010

Thursday, May 6, 2010

SubClinical Hypothyroidism

About Me

My photo
Charleston; Myrtle Beach, SC; Raleigh-Durham, NC; Orlando, FL, GA, NC, SC, VA, FL, United States
http://www.PHC365.com http://www.CarolinaHolisticMedicine.com http://www.CentralFloridaHolisticMedicine.com